Is age 30 late to buy a first home?
Slideshows
November 2, 2012
House + Homes

Homeward bound?

Turks are the most likely to have returned to live with friends and family due to financial difficulties, with 18% of respondents saying they have done this. At the other end of the scale is the Dutch, with 3%.

The first step

Brits are the youngest to enter the property market, at the median age of 25. This is five years younger than our European consumer median age of 30. Germans tend to buy late, with a median age of 33.

Family financing

Italians are the most likely to get financial help from family and friends when buying a home, with 62% of homeowners there saying they had this assistance. The Dutch were least likely (16%) followed by the French (25%).

Homes are how much?

Luxembourgers are most likely to think house prices are expensive, with 93% saying they are. The view is widespread with our European consumer average coming in at 71%.

Pain in Spain

Spanish are least upbeat about the prospect of property prices rising soon. Only 11% expect property prices to go up next year – the lowest proportion in the survey.

Rent or buy?
Poles are the most likely to own their own homes, with 69% in our poll saying they are. Next are Italians and Luxembourgers, both with 68%. At the other end of the scale are Germans at 39%, the only nation in the survey where more people rented than owned.

At what age do people tend to buy their first home? Where is renting more popular than buying? Which nationalities are more likely to get help from family when buying their home?

The ING International Survey on Homes and Mortgages polled 15,054 people in 15 countries about where they live, how they pay for their home and their feelings about it. The results expose some fascinating insights about attitudes to homes around Europe.

How does your country compare?
We see Brit homeowners tend to enter the property market early, at a median age of 25. This compares to the median age for our European consumer of 30. The six slides above also offer insights into findings about Italians, Spanish, Turks, Poles, Dutch and more. How does your country compare?