Ian's list

Top picks from the web on money and your life, from ING economist Ian Bright – April 9, 2014

Who’s more charitable?

Who’s more charitable?

There may be a link between getting a financial bonus and a lack of willingness to give to charity, new research suggests. A study by economists Mirco Tonin and Michael Vlassopoulos, cited in Third Sector, found that people in their experiment who were given a larger performance bonus were actually less likely to make a donation. The authors suggest a reason could be that people instinctively attribute their high pay or bonuses to being a reward purely for their own skills and effort (even if there is an element of luck involved) and feel entitled to keep the money.

Stress and financial decisions

Stress and financial decisions

When people are stressed, they tend to cut the time they spend researching investment options before making an investing decision, a paper by Professor Liam Delaney of Stirling University finds. Additionally, Delaney writes that many financial decisions can involve stress at the time they are made – so the implication may be that many of us take fewer exploratory and “future-oriented” financial decisions.

The long and the short of it

The long and the short of it

Long-term unemployment may act like a trap for those stuck out of work, blogs economist and author Tim Harford. He cites a new Brookings Institute research paper by Alan Krueger (senior adviser to Barack Obama during the recession) suggesting many employers may ignore the long-term unemployed, perhaps even offering higher wages to attract workers from the ranks of the short-term unemployed. Harford writes that there is no simple policy cure for the “discomforting” situation.

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Ian Bright
Ian Bright

Senior economist at ING
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