Slideshows | September 18, 2013

Which country is the most optimistic on house prices?

House prices play a big role in the financial lives of many people. So where are people feeling optimistic about the price of homes – and where are people taking a more subdued approach?

The ING International Survey on Homes and Mortgages 2013 asked almost 12,000 people in 12 countries in Europe to find out.

Growth in the economy?
For the second consecutive year, this major survey on the attitudes of people in Europe to property found feelings on the outlook for homes echoed movements in the wider economy.

 

1

Going up

Turks are the most optimistic about house prices, with 77% saying prices will rise in the next year.

2

Big Brit turnaround

The United Kingdom has seen the biggest turnaround in house price attitudes, with 61% expecting prices to rise in the next year – a 56% rise from our 2012 survey.

3

Pain still remains in Spain

Spanish are the least optimistic about house prices for the second year of the survey in a row, with 17% saying prices will rise in the next year.

4

Fewer upbeat in France

France saw the biggest fall in the share expecting house prices to rise in the next year, with 42% in the 2013 survey saying they will and 53% in 2012 saying they will.

5

Opportunity to get ahead

Germany has the largest share of mortgagors who are paying their mortgage off more quickly because interest rates are low.

6

Dutch courage

The Dutch cope well with paying their housing costs, with only 13% saying they find it difficult to pay their rent or mortgage each month – the lowest share in the survey.

This article is related to the ING International Survey:

Homes and Mortgages 2013

Homes and Mortgages 2013

September 18, 2013

Living in a “dream home” is important for most people in Europe. So do they think the price will rise and are they willing to move away to get it? The second annual ING International Survey on Homes and Mortgages...

EconomicsEuropeHouse buyingHouse prices

eZonomics team
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