Stories | October 28, 2014

“Must reads”: What the eZonomics community is reading in 2014

At the start of summer, we published a list if ING economists’ “must reads” for 2014.

Now, it’s the turn of the eZonomics community to share the books they recommend. The email and Twitter contributions came from Turkey, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, and range from time-tested titles through to those published this year.

Jeroen Plag
The Soft Edge, Rich Karlgaard
This 2014 book is about the five variables – trust, taste, teamwork, story and smarts – that make up “the soft edge”. Karlgaard explains how the soft edge is to be found in a company's core values, next to strategy and execution. He describes how the five variables within the soft edge provide for more innovation, while accelerating strategy and execution. It’s a very timely book to read on “how” to achieve our “why”.

Annie Shaw
Debt: The First 5,000 Years, David Graeber and The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap, Matt Tahibbi
Making a #summerofbooks recommendation from her @CashQuestions Twitter profile, Shaw first suggests the book by anthropologist Graeber that presents a “reversal of conventional wisdom” around the history of money and credit. Her second suggestion is the 2014 exploration of growing wealth inequality in the United States by Rolling Stone magazine editor Tahibbi.
Shaw’s final suggestion is for a summary of the 696 page Thomas Piketty bestseller included in the ING economists’ list “if summer is not long enough” to read the original.

Cem Timurkan
Start Late, Finish Rich, David Bach
Another recommendation from Twitter, @CemTimurkan suggests the books of financial author and motivational speaker David Bach. While some of the titles date from the 1990s, he sums up the oeuvre by writing “still relevant...still teaching...".

What’s on your list?
The 2014 “must read” list from ING economists is here and the 2013 list is here.
If you have a book to recommend, tell us here or if you have a question to ask our economist Ian Bright, post it here.

eZonomics team
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